How does Babs's mask stay on? It's gone from cowl to cap, by the looks of it.

Asked by Anonymous

batgirlofburnside:

jaebird88:

harmonica89:

batgirlofburnside:

jaebird88:

batgirlofburnside:

It stays on because comics.

-CS

So much for being practical, I guess.

How does Superman fly? How does he shoot laser beams from his eyes? How does Wonder Woman’s lasso work? How does Batman never get any sleep and still function? How does Booster Gold travel back in time? How does the Joker manage to speak clearly after his face was literally ripped off?

actually the cap would just hold on because of friction. it has so much area of connection. and if say you add a friction improving surface on the inside it holds on even better.

also if you ask this go bother almost every comic book artist ever how women are supposed to fight in high heels or capes

So, friction can keep it from being yanked off by anybody?

Who’s going to yank it off? I have the scripts for our first few issues in front of me. I can’t find any scenes where someone’s yanked on it. We didn’t write any.

I’m also PRETTY certain Batman’s cowl being connected to his cape isn’t what’s stopping him from being unmasked.

I would argue it’s because Batman.

And electro-shock defenses.

I’m sure Babs will be fine.

Did you guys know that I’m taking commissions?

Both black and white originals, and color printed with black and white originals included are available directly from my site.

You can check them out and order one through my webstore located here.

You can also message me here, or shoot me an email at info@gavinguidry.com if you have any special requests or specific thing you’re looking for.

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leseanthomas:

"Cartoon Brew: What got you interested in animation?

Aymeric Kevin: Japanese anime. Like it was the case for many, it started as a hypnotic fixation with the shonen genre. Anime had a large presence in France in the 1990s—shows like Dragon Ball, Saint Seiya, City Hunter, evenFist of the North Star—there were many shows being aired on TV at the time. Later on, Masaaki Yuasa’s Mind Game and Hayao Miyazaki’s Princess Mononoke swept me away and to this day remain my favorite films. It was during high school when I become really fascinated in the animation process through the making of videos, peeking into the world of the many devoted people working together, sweating over the desks, crunched over focused on a singular mission. This made me want to be in this industry. I still spend hours re-watching the documentary, How Mononoke Hime was Born (Mononoke Hime wa koushite umareta). For those who have not seen it yet, I highly recommend it.

Cartoon Brew: Gobelins has a good track record of producing remarkable student films. What makes Gobelins different and what did you learn there?

Aymeric Kevin:
 The rhythm here is quick; the moment you are accepted into the school the pace of progression within their walls accelerate. The fact is, they usually choose people with solid drawing skills to begin with, and that is probably why the fast pace is sustainable. Gobelins likes to remind people they are not going to teach anyone how to draw; they teach how to animate. Yet they offer a very comprehensive course where students are taken through every stage of the animation production. Knowing all of the stages and processes helps you make better decisions whatever you end up doing in animation.

What I have mainly learned though started as a realization during the first entrance exam. I was in a large room with rows of tables, but more importantly, rows filled with hundreds of applicants. It was
clear: there are a lot of drawers out there. This emulation, this reality of competition, remains strong and vigilant throughout the years at Gobelins. Whether it is good or bad, it undeniably pushes one to do their best at all times.” 

http://www.cartoonbrew.com/interviews/delivering-quality-on-a-tight-schedule-an-interview-with-ping-pong-art-director-aymeric-kevin-101497.html

This is getting out of hand, everybody. 
6 months in no time flat…or probably in exactly 6 months. High-res

This is getting out of hand, everybody.
6 months in no time flat…or probably in exactly 6 months.

How do you feel about the response to the new Batgirl design? Just looking on Tumblr, I'm... Really impressed and amazed at how quickly everyone seems to have taken to it - You should be really pleased.

Asked by weareallwintersoldiers

cameron-stewart:

I am overwhelmed and ecstatic and grateful and vindicated. I couldn’t be happier with the tidal wave of support and sincere joy that’s come our way, the (literally) hundreds of pieces of fan art that are being breathlessly drawn faster than I can look at them, the cosplayers already choosing fabrics and causing yellow Dr Martens boots to sell out online. The huge response is a clear sign that despite our detractors we’ve really tapped into something that was waiting to explode. But all of this is for naught if everyone doesn’t actually *buy the book* - so I would really strongly urge everyone who loves the new Batgirl to PREORDER at your local comic shop. Tell them you want it, show your retailer the same excitement for Batgirl that you’ve shown us.

Thanks for all the love, it is returned to you in full.

-C

It’s so hard to maintain confidence as an aspiring comic artist, when the community can seem so small and tight knit, yet so large that your attempts to show yourself go almost entirely unnoticed. The first thought you have in these instances always involves your work not being good enough.

TL;DR The void, it consumes.